The Stick Season Tour

Noah Kahan: The Stick Season Tour

W/ Noah Kahan, Jack Van Cleaf
$59.50 - $122.50
18+

About This Event

Artist Presale: Monday, September 19 @ 10am
Spotify Presale: Tuesday, September 20 @ 10am
Citi® Cardmember Presale: Tuesday, September 20 @ 10am
Live Nation Presale: Tuesday, September 20 @ 10am
Ticketmaster Presale: Wednesday, September 21 @ 10am
Venue Presale: Wednesday, September 21 @ 10:00am
Presales End: Thursday, September 22 @ 11:59pm
Public On sale: Friday, September 23 @ 10am

Stick Season VIP Package
Includes: ​
- One (1) General admission ticket
- Early entry into venue
- Intimate 2 song performance and storytellers style Q&A
- Exclusive signed VIP poster
- Official VIP laminate
- Limited availability

This event is 18+ however minors are permitted w/ parent or legal guardian.
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PLEASE RIDESHARE - Parking is limited around the venue. We strongly recommend using rideshare apps like Uber or Lyft for transportation to and from the venue. There is a designated rideshare pick up / drop off location near the entrance for your convenience.
 
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This show currently has no COVID safety requirements for attendees. This is subject to change. If this changes we will be sure to update this page as well as notify all ticket buyers via email.

Artist Info

Noah Kahan
Seasons change. Places change. People change. As Noah Kahan changes, he casts those experiences onto songs like light through a film projector. The Vermont singer pens songs straight from the heart and cracks jokes with his signature, self-deprecating sense of humor; he’s just changed in all of the right ways (and chronicled them via his songwriting).

After 5 years of critical acclaim, global touring, and numerous collaborations, Kahan sought an even purer style of writing and arrangement, a challenge from within to convey a vivid representation of what he loves, fears, and struggles with most passionately.

Through his journey from small town Vermont to global renown, he’s racked up over one billion streams, released two full length albums (Busyhead, 2019 and I Was / I Am, 2021) and a mid-pandemic EP (Cape Elizabeth, 2020). Noah has remained prolific in 2022 with his single “Stick Season.” Rife with fluttering guitar melodies, inviting vocals, and homey imagery of the Northeast on the verge of a change of seasons, the track represents another massive turning point for him.

“I wrote ‘Stick Season’ without knowing it would become, in my opinion, the most important song of my career,” he muses. “It allowed me to finally cross over into the style of songwriting that I have loved my entire life, and the second I finished writing it, I felt a level of comfort and honesty that I had never previously felt since I began my journey in music. Being able to tell a story, and being able to relate it back to my home in New England in such an honest way, made me believe in myself again.” Fans reacted immediately and after performing the song live on social media, his followers relentlessly commenting about releasing the song. Noah tested “Stick Season” live on tour to a rousing response, and a fan’s video of the moment circulated quickly online. In an instant, Kahan’s relationship with his career was altered, his conviction for storytelling and a pursuit of a more organic sound that aligned with the folk music of his upbringing had firmly arrived.

“Stick Season” paints one of his most arresting lyrical pictures yet, likening “feeling left behind and trapped” into the decomposition of leaves on the ground with a disarmingly unfiltered final visual, “Now you’re tire tracks, and one pair of shoes, and I’m split in half, but that’ll have to do.”

“It’s about seeing the other side of a place you thought was only beautiful,” he reveals. “As a relationship ends, some place or someone you used to look back at so fondly quickly transforms into a memory of pain. The beauty of autumn foliage in Vermont transforms into a brown and gray wasteland as we wait for the first snow. It is an unfortunate but necessary transition, similar in so many ways to the transition from familiar lovers into heartbroken strangers. I like to look at the song as hopeful; winter will come, the snow will fall, melt, and eventually summer will be back in all its beauty. You will suffer, move on, and survive again. The last line speaks to the acknowledgement of the end: an inventory of the pieces left behind and an acceptance of the future.”

For as much as he may have changed, Noah’s goal stays the same.

“I still want to be able to connect to folks in the way I do and value when I listen to music,” he leaves off. “Change is something you can learn from. It’s never too late to be a better person and to move forward. Always work on yourself and give yourself a fucking break every once in a while. I hope listeners feel like there’s more to learn about me, just like I do when I listen to my favorite artists. I also hope they’re happy to stay along for the ride, because I’ve been so grateful for them so far.”
Jack Van Cleaf
California-reared singer-songwriter Jack Van Cleaf writes determined and delicate songs with poetic slant and confessional warmth. At twenty- five, Van Cleaf has taken stage at notable venues including The Basement, Neumos, and Wire Chicago. Intimate performances with Sofar Sounds have found Van Cleaf captivating audiences from New York City to Austin, Texas. 
 Jack lives and writes alongside other young songwriters including Annika Bennett, Gatlin, and Ethansroom. In his songs folk imagination dresses in cinematic production, evoking the spacious and sparse verses of Nathaniel Rateliff and Gregory Alan Isakov. His music also echoes his heroes: a directness borrowed from Kris Kristofferson and lucid spirituality reminiscent of Cohen. 
 'Fruit From the Trees,' Van Cleaf's premiere full-length record, opens like a lost suitcase. Written across the last seven years, the ten tracks are stashed with fables and fictions, letters to high school lovers, loose change in foreign currency, and a white bandana chalked in red Texas dust. Co-produced by Jamie Mefford (Nathaniel Rateliff, Gregory Alan Isakov) and Alberto Sewald (Katy Kirby), the record soars with sonic width that melds the folk-song precision of Dawes with a rumbled raucousness suggestive of The Killers. 'Fruit From the Trees' marks an ambitious and colorful arrival for the emerging singer-songwriter.

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